August 29, 2022

Episode #46: Eric Marvin – Elakai Outdoor Games and American Cornhole Association

Eric Marvin was born in the suburbs of Chicago, IL where he developed a personal drive to do everything in life to the fullest. After walking on to the Western Michigan University D1 Varsity hockey team, Eric went on to play a couple of years of professional hockey. Through relationships made in the hockey world, Eric was able to begin a corporate career in the hockey industry and then onto larger consumer product brands.

After a successful career with brands like Vaughn Custom Sports, Warrior Sports, Escalade Sports, Powerade, Newell Brands, Coleman, Smith & Wesson, and American Outdoor Brands, Eric took what he learned and went out on his own.

He is now the an owner and managing partner in the American Cornhole Association and Elakai Outdoor. Both companies are sell direct to consumer and have their own unique circumstances that make them fun to grow. Both ACA and Elakai offer great quality games with the ultimate goal of getting people engaging with others outdoors. Whether you are just looking for a fun game to get friends and family together or want to show appreciation to employees or clients, Elakai and ACA have options for you. Our websites are www.playcornhole.org and www.elakaioutdoor.com.

Transcript

hello this is coach tim campsall and i’m your host for the self made is a myth make a difference together show where we’re talking with successful business owners to hear their stories of the journey to building their business and because we know that success in business isn’t something that we can do on our own we recognize the folks who have helped us to excel today i’m excited to have a fellow business owner uh with us today from michigan my guest played professional hockey and has multiple patents he loves paddle boarding and is most proud of the family and life that he’s built it’s my pleasure to welcome eric to the show today hello eric hi tim how are you i am awesome thank you for asking well let’s jump in i’m going to have you start by introducing yourself and tell us a little bit of your personal story like where you were born where you live and about your family yeah um well first of all thanks for having me um so my name is eric i have been in uh well i come from naperville illinois uh moved all over uh my kids uh laugh at me because uh when they ask where they’re from uh i’ve got five kids and i think they were born in three different states i’ve moved everywhere from from southern texas to oregon to different places in indiana illinois and michigan uh and and a small stop in memphis uh a lot of those thoughts were due to hockey uh i played college hockey and into the minors and and then from there that kind of ramped up uh my uh my corporate career and as i got into sporting goods um made the transition from hockey to a hockey company um and uh got into product manager role and and then from there uh you know there to now just a a couple uh a couple key learning experiences and corporate jobs along the way that that got me to starting my own business and then uh having ownership and and managing partner in in two businesses so um that’s kind of where where i’m at awesome and uh introduce us to your wife yeah so um my family i’ve got a wife we’re going on 15 years married her name is jenny uh i’ve got five kids ranging from 12 to a year and a half a mix of boys and girls so i get get the great mix and um fortunately uh three are at the age where they can start playing hockey and uh so i’m running back and forth to the rink now wonderful so tell us a funny story that your family likes to share about you that uh that you’d be willing to to share today yeah so um you know conceptually i started my outdoor games business probably you know seven years ago um i didn’t actually start it until two years ago um but uh the funny thing about all that is um you know my my uh wife’s family um you know and and uh our family we we weren’t naturally um big outdoor games people uh so at our big family parties and stuff like that you know it wasn’t uh it wasn’t natural for the the group of us all to play so i never put them out and so they they joke with me that i own two outdoor games companies um and so finally um you know when the weather got nice this year that first family party there was a plethora of games for everyone to enjoy fantastic so you get some free market research well you know what um i actually use my kids all the time to market test um because kids can break anything and they can fast so when it comes to a quality uh and durability standpoint they’re the best testers out there right that’s awesome so eric tell us how did the business come about and at what point did you have the confidence that you could run your own business um yeah so great questions um i was at uh i was early on i think i was in my second stop in my corporate career um and i was managing some indoor and outdoor games categories um and and the company that i was working for wanted to enter um that tailgating space with corn hole and and everything um and they didn’t want to play in that category at a price point level they wanted to carve out their own little niche and and so basically you know i had to go out there and create uh well we looked at licensing and we looked at creating our own ultimately creating our own one out um just with with cost structure and everything um and so then i went forward with our creative team and and um an outside designer and um built a product assortment and brand from scratch um and uh really enjoyed that process enjoyed the i enjoy the outdoor uh lifestyle uh that came with the brands and um so you know it always sat in the back of my mind um in one day um you know i had moved on from that company and um noticed that you know it was basically just a retail brand at that point and the lifestyle aspect of it kind of fell off the social media fell off the website kind of fell off but the product was still out there um and uh you know i took my my learnings and and was like you know what um i think i think there is still an opportunity in this category for this to be done uh the way that i had envisioned and not just a retail brand but an actual lifestyle brand and and so that’s when i s that’s when i i decided um i was gonna give it a go um now the part of the question with when was i ready um i wasn’t ready yet at the point where i knew someday i would do it um and i still had to acquire uh knowledge in order for me to go out on my own and take the risk um at a certain point i was ready mentally to do it and i was doing it on the side uh you know i had a day job uh covet hit and man that sent me straight into this was my full-time job and um and that you know i haven’t looked back so that’s awesome so tell us a little bit more about both your companies so um the first company that i started um is ilikai outdoor and that’s a an all-inclusive outdoor games company um you know we uh this christmas we’re going to be launching another nine products we just launched two more uh this last month um and it’s it’s focused on outdoor living how do we how do we provide quality products that people can use at any event uh feel proud of and um you know the biggest thing for me was um there’s there’s a lot of um there’s a lot of games out there um and most times at gatherings or whatever they’re they’re kind of off to the side this allows um you know our our goal in this is for these games to become um

conversation starters um so like our staple products have like uh their hand poured resin uh epoxy resin mixed in and live edge wood and and our whole goal is for them to be you know to to be social um and and to allow people to come together and make memories um the other uh the other company is the american cornhole association um and roundabout story when i started illikai um my uh the manufacturing partner partner put me in touch with um the american cornhole association and um you know it was it was a natural fit that that we’d be a part of things because cornhole is is a part of elokai um and obviously that’s everything in the association um so those those are the two uh the two two different businesses and um it’s really fun to see them you know play together in some regard and then you know we have to keep them separate another other regard but it’s really fun to see how we can you know you take one hat off and put on the other so uh that that’s gotta at times be a little challenging to be able to to to manage both companies how do you how do you handle that um well it’s nothing new um and this is why you know um i think when when i was ready to do it i was ready to do it because um at all of the i would say all but maybe one or two of the companies i’ve worked for i’ve managed multiple brands and in some cases up to 13 brands that i had to manage all at once and keep straight and and positioned differently and and so this is my career i’ve been doing this um and so um to me it’s relatively easy the harder part in that is training the people that haven’t done that sure yeah because you know the language you use with consumers is different how you speak to them is different um the the areas of focus vary right between brand and um so that’s been been more of the fun stuff is is seeing other people go through it for the first time too awesome so eric share a story where someone pushed you or inspired you that you could do it even though maybe you didn’t think you could and the impact they had on you yeah well so the the first person that comes to mind um was um a manager that i had um dave corwin um he gave me insight that um i still carry with me today um and i try and teach uh to to anyone that’s on my team um and that is um you know you gather if a decision has to be made make it don’t wait on it take the information gather the information that that’s at hand and make a decision because oftentimes if you don’t make a decision that has more of a negative impact on your business then even if you make the wrong decision right which inevitably you will right i mean right make the right decision all the time um but if you don’t make it you you sometimes can hurt your business way more than help it um so that that’s the first piece um is you know he gave me the confidence in making decisions and he allowed me very young in my career to make some big decisions um for on behalf of the the business and and the department that i was in um and that i mean it’s invaluable um i couldn’t thank him more for that um i think the other um the other aspects of um you know in my current businesses my partners who have owned their own businesses for you know 20 plus years um knowing that that i haven’t owned my own business before and but that my experience uh within the corporate you know they allow me to to run and manage this um without uh you know uh a ton of questions without um you know any sort of distrust um and uh you know tim you and i have talked about it before i think the key there is just having aligned values knowing that that you have the right the right goals in in mind and that you’re you’re going to operate under the same kind of uh premise right with with the people and everything and um so that you know my current partner is just allowing me to to do what i know and and to trust that that um that i got it i think is is invaluable yeah yeah i i like what you said earlier about you know being willing to make decisions even if they they turn out to be wrong decisions like too many business owners will kind of sit on the fence right and over analyze or analysis paralysis right and and not end up making a decision and and miss out on a big opportunity and um and so i like what you’re saying about you know it’s kind of like fail forward like make a decision if it’s wrong it’s okay you’re gonna learn from it course correct and and keep going right correct yeah i mean what’s what’s worst case scenario i mean depending on the situation you could be out some money um but hopefully you’re not risking all of it sure um but the worst case scenario at the end of the day is you’ve learned something yeah um period and and you won’t make the same mistake twice um and and you can implement the learnings back into the business but um in this day and age with you know privacy changes and digital changes and algorithms and in different uh channels um if you’re not trying new things and making decisions on a daily basis to push your business forward you’re going to get left behind yeah yeah our founder says uh something along the lines of you’re either growing or you’re dying right so if you’re not taking chances and you’re not right reinventing the wheel if you’re not you know moving the business forward there’s no real such thing as status quo right right it used to be long time ago but now it doesn’t exist right if your status quo you’re actually dying because your competitors are moving forward yeah yeah i just um i read uh an article just yesterday um along the similar lines where they were they were talking to franchise owners and it was like you know if you only buy into one territory or one franchise one office you’ve just bought yourself a job if you buy in with multiple now you’ve now you’ve got a an income stream that allows you to reinvest plus live off of um and so you know it’s it’s just one of those things where sometimes you do have to invest in yourself and and make those decisions to to move forward you know so eric what’s your biggest learning as a business owner um well i think um you know uh learning uh the the gear shifters right within business um you know obviously working in the corporate field a lot of the corporations i’ve worked with you know you have some you have a lot more uh leeway in terms of cash flow right because they’re established business um when you’re doing it on your own if you don’t know your financials um it could be detrimental um and um and so you know it’s that balancing of going fast to grow a business um while still under control yeah right and and being able to to shift gears as you see fit both up and down um so that way you’re you know you’re you’re driving your cash flow the right way yeah um marcus from the show the prophet he says if you don’t know your numbers you don’t know your business correct yeah and to your point right if if you don’t know the impact of a decision that you’re about to make and you know what’s that’s going to do for your cash flow it could be you know hugely detrimental to the business so yeah well and and i i definitely think um you know for for those business owners out there that you know um don’t look at financials and everything there are so many different levers to pull um i think that that can make you profitable or more profitable in a month if you’re looking at your numbers regularly yes yeah you know i think you know i i look at my numbers every day um most of the businesses when i was at the executive level in the corporate landscape we looked at our uh our numbers both on a daily and weekly basis uh and then monthly quarterly i mean we you know you you slice and dice it every which way but if you and that’s where i learned the importance of of looking at that because there are things you can do to positively impact things without hurting the business yeah um you know um so knowing your financials is critical yeah i like what you said about when you when you break it down and you look at them it gives you opportunity to a whole bunch of different areas that you can impact profit so um you know just to illustrate that a little bit more for the folks listening is we break profit down into you know at least 350 strategies right in terms of here are things that have worked across the board with all of our different clients and you know just pick pick two or three right in each of the five different categories and implement those over the next uh two or three months and right and lit every little change you make every 10 adjustment that you make to different areas of the business has a multiplier effect right so it all starts to your point eric right you’ve got to know your numbers in order to know where to make those adjustments and and to track and see if those adjustments are having an impact to the overall business yeah exactly i mean i you know i’ve been a part of of some uh some companies that that didn’t know their financials when they finally dug into them you know um some of the owners weren’t on the same page um some um and and just because you get uh sometimes you take home money at the end of the year on taxes does not mean you’re profitable um and and i mean that that’s that’s a an example of like know your numbers um because just because um you know you you take a cash distribution or something right to lower your taxes does not mean you’re profitable um and and um you know i had one owner tell me what do you mean i’m not profitable when i was helping them with build that build a budget and financial model and um you know it was a surprise and they uncovered that they were you know hundreds of thousand dollars in debt and and you weren’t talking wow so it’s so important to have good communication and um and to know your numbers i mean it’s the most critical thing i think couldn’t agree with you more so eric we know that business doesn’t business success doesn’t happen in isolation so tell us about one of your biggest challenges during the your your your years as a business owner and maybe a fellow business owner or a colleague that came alongside you and helped you get through that yeah so well so um i would say um you know it wasn’t always my plan to partner with people um and and to do it um you know my original plan was to uh build elokai from the ground up uh manage it uh on the side and uh of day-to-day work um and i happened to be kayaking and fishing alongside a river in oregon with my family when we lived in in the portland area and met a fellow business owner uh or at that time not a fellow business when i was in the corporate world um and and he um uh he owns a successful business and dental practice and and um you know one of the things that he told me was um you know the really successful uh folks that he’s encountered have partnered with somebody because their skill set offsets something that they’re deficient in and then that allows them time to free up to continue to uh develop businesses or reinvest time in other places because now they they’re two or three or four people you know pulling up the bottom right yeah um and so um i would say that you know that impacted me to to say you know what um you know 40 of something or 30 of something or seventy percent of something um when it’s bigger and you have more balance and time to do other things that you love is more valuable than a hundred percent of something um especially you know depending on the the strengths of your partners and what they’re bringing to the table i mean it could be massively uh impactful yeah and so you know i would say that’s that’s where um when i sought out after partners you know i knew i was always going to have partners i have a large family and i want to spend time with them and so you know i looked for partners that had strengths in other areas i didn’t need somebody with the exact background that i have um i need somebody in manufacturing and you know the other side of the business that i don’t have as a core strength right um and so it was it was super impactful from that standpoint so um you know it’s it’s why i’m where i’m at uh with with on my own as a business owner and with um you know a brand that’s picking up steam and getting noticed and and everything like that you mentioned it earlier i think it’s important to to reinforce it here is that um partners just for the sake of partners is not you know necessarily going to be successful so you know as folks listening to this are exploring partnerships you want to make sure that you’ve got similar values and beliefs right to the folks that you’re partnering with because you know there’s going to be some tough decisions that need to be made in business right and some some gray decisions that are going to be made and you need to know at the end of the day that you’re fundamentally aligned right to the folks that you’re partnering with because you know when we bring in an opposite as eric mentioned right we’re going to rub each other you know and and you know they’re going to have a different perspective and a different opinion you know that’s why it’s a benefit but it also can be a friction right during challenging times and and so you want to make sure that you’ve got people who you who you know got your back right who know have the same values and the beliefs that you do so that you can you know trust and respect each other’s opinion so eric i know we’ve talked before it sounds like you’ve been able to find that for yourself is that a fair uh yeah i think you know um i think there were things as a business owner that that i’m still learning um that i’m thankful that my partners put in place early on right um within the the legal agreements and everything like that like you know knowing who has the final say and what is so important because like you said you’re not always going to agree especially if somebody has a perspective that’s different than yours and sometimes that’s an impasse so you need to know from a you know a structural standpoint who’s got that final say and you got to respect it right yeah because you signed an agreement that says hey you know when it comes to um you know an uh decision so and so has the final say but input’s needed and you know that stuff right but um you know things that i would not have thought of now i almost got into a partnership that probably would have not been uh i would not be where i’m at um and um you know i think it came back to values and uh it came back to communication um and um luckily you know that wasn’t the path that i was meant to go down um and and i was able to to see it soon enough um and you know tim you and i have talked about it before that courting process is so important to learn um about one another because you’re still it’s almost like an interview right and everyone’s on their best behavior everyone’s making great things um but it’s really important to get to know a potential partner and how they conduct business if you can prior to that yeah you know unless unless they’re just you know helping with funding and they’re a silent partner and that’s how you have it structured right um you know so there’s a ton of different ways to do it but but you do want to make sure that you go through some sort of vetting process and then you build a pretty comprehensive structure and agreement around the interaction on a day-to-day basis yeah our subconscious will attract our opposite right you hear that a lot in marriages right that that people marry marry their opposite it’s true with business partnerships as well because our subconscious knows what we’re lacking where we’re lacking or where you know different perspectives that we need but to your point right if we’re not if we’re not aware of that and right and we just you know get married overnight right and we don’t we don’t also think through right are we compatible right do we have the same life uh goals or or um vision for the organization are we do we have a similar morality level and and you know are we gonna make do are we going to align on what’s the right thing to do then it can it can be just like you know a marriage where you know people who rush into that right end up having significant challenges and and it’s not as as joyful as it could be for versus those who have taken their time to make sure it was the right fit yeah exactly yeah um i mean you know comparing it to marriage and growing with people and and um you know communication is key in that values is is key in that to make it work long-term and the last thing you want to do is get into a partnership and be miserable and know that your you know your savings or your uh your assets or however you structure your deal right which million ways to structure all that’s on the line yeah um and so you can’t just walk away unless unless you can come to some sort of deal to walk away but um you know you got to figure it out um and and you know people people in business that’s that’s one of the challenges of businesses is people and managing people and managing relationships and and managing um you know uh different communication styles and and everything like that um you know it’s um it’s just it’s imperative that you have those skills that can manage different uh different situations and different people yeah you you mentioned at you know signing the the contract up front and maybe it right not really making as much sense then as it did now and you know he for again for everyone listening right if we’re level-headed right it’s much easier to sign an agreement of what happens when we break up versus when we’re we don’t like the other person and we’re in the midst of potentially breaking up you know you’re not going to have to be able to sign a a reasonable contract at that point so much better do it when you don’t think you need it yes exactly well and um i mean things do evolve with the business right where you know responsibilities shift and everything there and and having a legal agreement in place is not a distrust thing it’s a clarity thing yeah um and and clarity uh makes for a um more often times it adds to a recipe for a good day when things are clear right um better communication better responsibility line of sight to goals um you know clarity is is so much um yes that’s all you’re doing is you’re creating clarity it’s not a distrust thing it’s not a you know um uh you know what if thing it’s uh this is how you operate and this is it’s clear yeah you know yeah very fair so eric if i asked you to pick three people in your business journey um as an owner that you are most grateful for being there uh that have contributed to your business growth who are those three people and how they help you um so hard um okay so the first one i would say is my wife jenny right um being able to encourage bounce things off of um be on board with taking a risk um right um the other um i would say i’m gonna group some people together so my corporate life which gave me the skills and and the knowledge to be able to go out on my own uh you know like uh i was saying dave earlier you know taught me how to make decisions right um you know learning the financials and having to report them out to board of directors and you know publicly traded companies and and presidents of non-public companies and all that stuff um along the way just managing people right um i had one situation where you know uh it was a large corporation and and i i could not let somebody go who’s being disrespectful to me not listening to me as i was managing and i am so thankful for that because it allowed me to learn managing people and and me in order to get through and motivate which was so key along the way um and then again you know i kind of touched on it earlier i would say that third grouping are my current set of partners right that trust uh that have the same values that allow me to do what i i i know how to do um and then you know to rely on them for the things that they know how to do um so i you know those are kind of the sections right your family support and then i think my corporate life and then and then now my business owner life and and how all that intersects i i i really couldn’t choose um three because way more people have been and and goes to the conversation right like you can’t do this on your own like at some point whether it’s education you know if you start a business in high school somebody somebody helped you what maybe it was your dad when went and helped you buy your first lawnmower for a commercial lawn mowing or whatever like i mean somebody has helped you along the way um you know you’re never fully alone in in what you’re doing you mentioned your your wife as your number one i would say that for myself as well um there’s a lot of you know ups and downs in running a business right you mentioned there’s a lot of risk in it the first couple years are incredibly challenging to get things working and it’s just amazing to have somebody right on your side who’s got your back right can give you that encouragement and motivation and support and i just keep you know keep affirming us that you know we’re we’re doing what we’re meant to do and to hang in there well and and i know with my wife it’s it’s also it’s it’s not only that support but it’s also the challenge right of of doing the right thing you know she’s not a business um minded person um she’s more like psychology and and thinking through things so i get a totally different perspective to where she challenges me to make sure that that i’m doing everything i can um and and doing the right things and and everything there so it’s kind of the balance of keeping me you know um you know supported and moving forward and and she’s got my back but also you know checking me where where maybe um i’ve lost sight of something right or uh or i could have handled something differently or said it a different way she’s she’s my you know my checkpoint on that yeah that’s awesome so eric as you think about the next three to five years and um what are the biggest challenges that you’re going to face to reach your goals and who are the types of people you’re going to need to help you overcome those challenges yeah i also um you know in terms of of the next three to five years i think one of the biggest challenges that that we’re gonna find um in my two businesses is um you know your your path and the opportunity picking the right opportunities in order for the businesses to grow the right way um you know seeing seeing the opportunities that maybe are great opportunities but not right now opportunities right um you know i’ve got a licensing opportunity for elokai that would be massive um but you know i don’t know that it’s the right time which is super unfortunate and sad because i love this other brand um you know so um you know the the checks and balances and and the partners that that i currently have um you know just balancing things off of them um you know i also think um other challenges you know i i don’t plan on stopping with two companies um i i want to continue to grow our um direct to consumer brands and and our consumer product brands um and and there’s opportunity to um you know i’ve got got tons of ideas and and category research that that will allow us to get into some other um sporting good categories um and you know it’s gonna take partners to get on board with those because because it’s gonna utilize resources it’s gonna utilize funding um and um so that those are three to five years all of that’s realistic um and and all decisions that are going to have to be made that’s awesome you you mentioned lots of ideas i i in your intro i mentioned that you’ve got a number of patents are they all within this this space um no so i’ve got a couple um in um in other sporting good categories and so hockey um pickleball um i’ve got uh what else is it in uh oh uh rifle scopes uh we’ve got uh we’ve got a patent in that um and uh and so yeah i i don’t plan on uh we’ve got one one of them is in cornhole uh it’s a it’s a bag um a certain bag design um that we put under the american cornhole association um and um you know just there’s there’s a bunch of other i mean you know if you’ve ever come across people or you yourself invented anything um to decide to patent something um is a very carefully decided thing right because sometimes you just want to be first to market uh and and you’ll get more bang for your buck doing that right because it’s really hard to um to patent and protect right because um you know i know in my corporate life you know we would sit there and we’d look at it if we really wanted to get into a space and there was a patent there we would look at all right how do we get around this yep how are how are the claims structured um and um in some cases it’s easy yeah and in other cases it’s really hard they’ve done a really good job with their patent um and and it varies uh you know by product um so like i we just launched a product under elokai that if i was with a big corporation i would have patented it um but uh under elokai and with the amount of dollars um knowing that it’s not going to be it’s not one of our number one or number two products um it was just worth it to get it out there uh to the public as the original right um so yeah it’s a i know we uh you know it’s always cool to say you invented or you have a patent but in some cases it is a waste of money unfortunately uh that is the reality of it because other people have money to get around then indeed so jim rohn said we become the average of the five people we spend the most time with so eric as you think about that what advice would you have for business owners who are trying to do it on their own um i mean kudos kudos to you um that is it’s hard work um and um you know i would just say you know if you are doing it on your own surround yourself with a good support staff somebody that can can check and balance you if you have a group of friends that are also business owners and without giving up equity you can do coffee once every month once every two weeks just to bounce ideas off of you you want uh business-minded support um and you know uh it’s always good like i’ve i’ve joined groups before where it’s been like you know for coffee and one guy’s you know a marketing guy one guy’s a sales guy you know or whatever right and you just bounce ideas off of one another but um having having that support um and sounding bored is is important and if you don’t have it um you know read lots uh there’s lots of good articles out there um you know you don’t have to do it 100 alone right whether it’s whether it’s um podcasts or like yours tim i mean whether it’s um reading articles um or or um you know find a mentor if you can just one person to have lunch with or coffee invite somebody out pick their brain and and uh you know um say thank you and and uh and try and implement things to push your business forward technology i love what you say because technology’s made it’s almost eliminated any excuse for not having a mentor because we can read a book right and that can be our mentor if we don’t like reading we can listen to an audio book right or we can watch a youtube video or a pod listen to a podcast so that there really is no excuse for not having you know those five people in our life right even if it’s not physical people or people that we know it can be you know successful business owners who are sharing their value with others and uh and we’re able to take advantage of that through a book or a video yeah right um partners doesn’t mean you’re giving up equity yeah right um it doesn’t mean that at all um in some cases maybe it’s totally worth it too in other cases it it could just be you know again a sounding board support um and whatever um you know doing business kind of together and and bouncing things off but it doesn’t it doesn’t mean equity it doesn’t mean you give up any part of your business uh it just means that you’re continuing your education around your business right that’s all and i liked what you said earlier about you know staying in your lane in terms of what your expertise is so there’s there’s outsourced opportunities as well right where you’re not giving up uh equity you’re just paying whether that be an outsourced cfo right or outsourced hr services or payroll or marketing like there’s lots of marketing there’s i mean um you know there’s certifications out there that you yourself can get and that just allows you to have support um so you know partnerships are bigger than just business owners yeah and you know i think if you open up open up to someone to help right you just have to be open to to help in any way yeah and you got partner you know yeah awesome so eric sounds like you’ve been blessed with some incredible people who have helped you on your journey if they were all on the show here today what would you want to say to them

just uh just thank you um you know i’ve learned a lot from them hopefully hopefully they’ve been able to to learn some stuff from me um and and i’ve been able to help them and give back to them somehow um they’ve been uh you know a tremendous support and and these two businesses wouldn’t be there without them um at any level when i was in corporate these two businesses wouldn’t be here without the people that that gods put in my path um and um and my family uh i mean none of this would be possible without without a a higher level of path because i couldn’t write it i i’m not that smart that i could have been like i’m gonna move here and meet this guy or i’m

or i’m going to choose the manufacturer here and and they’re going to become part like you just can’t write that so um you know thank you for for making sure you know that you you keep me honest and and humble and um open to possibility awesome so eric it’s been a pleasure speaking with you today and i really appreciate having you on the show yeah thanks for having me tim it was awesome to everyone who tuned in thanks for listening to the self-made is a myth show with your host coach tim camsell be sure to help spread this movement by liking the show or it on your social media and to join our movement go to be mad together.com all right folks that’s a wrap make sure to pay it forward and i’ll see you all next time take care